Tarrega: “Adelita” – by Per-Olov Kindgren

Adelita is one of Tarrega’s most well-known compositions and is played by amateurs and professionals alike. Apparently, Tárrega named the piece Adelita because he dedicated the piece to the illegitimate daughter King Alfonso XII, Adela Aimerich.

Here Per-OLov Kindgren plays the piece, which I have graded as Level 6 (Higher exit).

Winter(largo) by Vivaldi played by Steven Law

This is a Level/Grade 5 (Intermediate) piece composed by Vivaldi for the violin and transposed for the guitar. Antonio Lucio Vivaldi was an Italian Baroque composer, virtuoso violinist, teacher and cleric. Born in Venice, he was as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread across Europe.

The piece is played by Steven Law, a member of a new breed of musical star who connect with fans directly through the Internet. His hundreds of guitar videos often feature tunes from modern pop songs and anime, and have been freely shared millions of times by grateful fans all over the world.

Un dia de Novembre by Leo Brouwer

I have placed this haunting little piece at Grade 4 (Lower Exit) in my system, and Guitaburst have assigned it to Level 8 . It is an advanced beginner or entrance intermediate piece. Here it is played by Tatyana Ryzhkova

J.S.Bach Air on a G string played by Per-Olov KIndgren

Air on a G String is an arrangement for the violin from Johann Sebastian Bach’s Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D major. Bach originally wrote the suite for Prince Leopold of Anhalt in the early 18th century. It only became known as Air on a G String in 1871 when the German violinist August Wilhelmj made a violin and piano arrangement of the second movement of this orchestral suite. By changing the key into C major and transposing the melody down an octave, Wilhelmj was able to play the piece entirely on the G string of his violin.

Tárrega: Gran Vals – Anika Hutschreuther

Here, German classical guitarist Anika Hutschreuther plays Gran Vals by the great Francisco Tárrega;  my favourite waltz for guitar.

Anika studied at the Stuttgart Academy of Music and the Hamburg conservatory. She plays classical guitar and baroque guitar at the highest level and performs as a soloist and chamber musician in Germany and abroad.

J. S. Bach: Cello Suite Nr. 1 BWV 1007, arr. Smaro Gregoriadou

And now for something completely different!

The guitar featured in this performance was made by Greek luthier Yorgos Kertsopoulos. He describes the instrument as “designed and constructed by me in 1996 and it is a multi-timbre rectangular guitar with movable back pedal. As the guitarist plays, by pressing slightly the guitar’s back to her/his chest, pedal effects on the sound are produced

You can access the luthier’s site HERE.

Here is John Feeley playing the same piece on a conventional classical guitar.

An Malvina by Johann Kaspar Mertz

Matthew McAllister plays with his usual competence and style – you can view his website HERE. The piece, Bardenklänge, Op. 13, No. 1,  is by J.K.Mertz, a 19th century virtuoso and composer. He was married to a concert pianist and his compositions reflect her influence on his music.

Drew Henderson plays Zapateado

Joaquin Rodrigo was born in Sagunto, Valencia, and lost his sight at the age of three. Despite this, he began to study piano and violin at the age of eight. Many credit him with raising the Spanish guitar to dignity as a universal concert instrument and he is best known for his guitar music. However, he never mastered the instrument himself.

Drew Henderson is a virtuoso classical guitarist often cited as one Canada’s best young classical guitarists. Here he plays the final movement of Tres Piezas Españolas by Joaquin Rodrigo (1901-1999)

Asturias (Leyenda) by Isaac Albeniz

Here South Korean brother and sister (Soojin  and Seongjun Lee) play Asturias (Leyenda) Op. 47 by Isaac Albéniz (1860-1909). This well-known classical guitar piece, although usually played as a solo performance, was originally written for piano, so a duo arrangement probably comes closer to the composer’s original intent.