Agustìn Barrios – Confesiòn / played by Lorenzo Bernardi

I have taken this video from my favourite classical guitar teaching site, Bradford Werner’s Thisisclassicalguitar.

This what Bradford writes concerning this performance:

Lorenzo Bernardi Plays Confesiòn by Paraguayan guitarist and composer, Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885–1944). This comes via Bernardi’s Youtube Channel. Guitar made by Philip Woodfield. Some nice musical playing by this young Italian guitarist. “Also known as Confesión de Amor (Confession of Love), Confesión is an example of the genre known as romanza, a slow, melodic piece in duple metre expressive of romantic feeling. Barrios wrote this work in 1923 and recorded it on 21st June, 1928. Here he places the melody in the bass register with the harmonic accompaniment in the upper voices. A profound knowledge of the instrument is necessary to achieve this type of textural writing, and Confesión, together with his Romanza en Imitación al Violoncello, is a masterful display of virtuosity and skill.

I have posted Barrios’ Confesion before but I particularly like this interpretation.

 

An Malvina by Johann Kaspar Mertz

Matthew McAllister plays with his usual competence and style – you can view his website HERE. The piece, Bardenklänge, Op. 13, No. 1,  is by J.K.Mertz, a 19th century virtuoso and composer. He was married to a concert pianist and his compositions reflect her influence on his music.

Drew Henderson plays Zapateado

Joaquin Rodrigo was born in Sagunto, Valencia, and lost his sight at the age of three. Despite this, he began to study piano and violin at the age of eight. Many credit him with raising the Spanish guitar to dignity as a universal concert instrument and he is best known for his guitar music. However, he never mastered the instrument himself.

Drew Henderson is a virtuoso classical guitarist often cited as one Canada’s best young classical guitarists. Here he plays the final movement of Tres Piezas Españolas by Joaquin Rodrigo (1901-1999)

Asturias (Leyenda) by Isaac Albeniz

Here South Korean brother and sister (Soojin  and Seongjun Lee) play Asturias (Leyenda) Op. 47 by Isaac Albéniz (1860-1909). This well-known classical guitar piece, although usually played as a solo performance, was originally written for piano, so a duo arrangement probably comes closer to the composer’s original intent.

Prelude in A Min Op 59 by Matteo Carcassi

I have added a subsection ‘Additional material for Level 1B’ at the end of Basic Level Players/Musical Scores/Level 1B. The first entry in this subsection is Prelude in A Min from Matteo Carcassi’s Guitar Method Vol 1 (Op 59).

Matteo Carcassi (1792 – 1853) was a  guitar virtuoso  and composer who lived most of his adult life in Paris.  His most famous works are collected in his 25 Etudes op.60 where he blended technical skills with good ‘romantic’ music.

La Catedral

Ana Vidovic plays La Catedral by Augustine Barrios, one of the hardest classical guitar pieces  to play.

Ana is of Croatian origin and started playing the classical guitar at five years of age. She started performing at the age of eight and is now 37 years of age (as at 2017) and is an internationally recognised performing and recording artist. She plays classical guitars designed and built by the Australian luthier Jim Redgate.

I have featured another piece written by Barrios in my previous post.

Alms for the love of God

David Russell performs “Una Limosna por el Amor de Dios” (Alms for the love of God). The last piece by Paraguayan classical guitarist and composer, Agustín Pío Barrios a Paraguayan virtuoso and composer, regarded as one of the greatest performers and most prolific composers for the classical guitar. His music remained undiscovered for over three decades after his death.

Prelude no. 1 by Villa-Lobos

 

Heitor Villa-Lobos was a Brazilian composer of more than 2,000 works. He dedicated his five Preludes, composed in 1940, to Arminda Neves dÁlmeida, his companion for the last 23 years of his life.

Irene Gomez is a pioneer of the classical guitar in her homeland, Colombia. Here she plays the lyrical Prelude No. 1 in E minor.

Stanley Myers “Cavatina”

This a beautiful but difficult piece originally written by Stanley Meyers for the piano but transcribed and expanded for guitar at the request of John Williams. Meyers wrote it for the film The Walking Stick in 1970, but it only became well known eight years later when it was used as the theme for The Deer Hunter.

John Williams was the first to perform Cavatina on the classical guitar. He recalls that when Andres Segovia heard him playing it he remarked that it was ‘a very pretty tune’. The word ‘cavatina’ is an Italian musical term meaning ‘a short song of simple character’, but the piece is anything but simple to play.

Here one of my favourite guitarists, Per-Olov Kindgren, plays Cavatina

If you let the clip play on you will discover a beautiful bonus, John Williams playing Julia Florida by Barrios.