Arthritis is a pain!

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Monkey Business Images/REX/Shutterstock (8619244a)

I stopped playing the guitar for many years because of arthritis in my left-hand fingers. I started to take daily vitamin and mineral supplements and about 3 years ago I was able to return to playing.

I don’t overdo it and usually play for only 30 minutes or less each day, but of late the pain has returned with a vengeance. Only my 1st and 4th fingers (left-hand index and pinkie) are affected. Both sometimes lock-up when I am playing and the pinkie is always swollen and stiff. I am treating the condition as best I can and I thought it might be helpful to share some of the ‘remedies’ I have read of or personally applied.

  • People on the various classical guitar fora recommend two external interventions:
    • Consult a medical specialist so that she can diagnose the condition and prescribe appropriately. I have not done this myself yet because of the high costs involved in specialist consultations and prescription medication, but I may well do so if I can’t alleviate the condition in other ways. I am taking an alkalising agent (base powder) regularly to get my body acid level down. I am hoping that this will ease the inflammation in the joints.
    • Consult an experienced guitar teacher to check your technique and the pressure you apply when playing. Again, I have not followed this advice because of the paucity of good classical guitar teachers in my area.
  • Every so often, I take an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication, but I don’t want to do this too often because of the risk of damaging the stomach lining. I have found that externally applied anti-inflammatory gel is next to useless for joint pain.
  • Some folk recommend Curcumin (Tumeric) with Piperine (Black Pepper) as a herbal anti-inflammatory and I am currently experimenting with this.
  • A common piece of advice I have read is to practice for short periods but very regularly. I practice for only 30 minutes every day and so can’t cut down on this and still hope to make progress as a player.
  • Warming up the hands before playing is also something others recommend and I have found it very beneficial to soak my hands in very warm water for a couple of minutes just before I play.
  • Warm-up hand and finger exercises also help. If I attempt to play complex pieces before warming up with simple exercises (scales etc.) then I invariably pay the price within minutes.
  • One blogger I read suggested changing the guitar configuration – lower tension strings and lower action, or even using a guitar with a shorter string scale length.

There doesn’t seem to be any greater wisdom out there on offer for classical guitar-playing arthritis sufferers like me, so I hope that this little list of possibilities may help those who also find arthritis a pain.

Selecting a Guitar: Four Pertinent Questions By John M. Gilbert

I found this article on the Delcamp Classical Guitar Forum. The late John Gilbert was a well-known builder of classical guitars who then devoted his time to the production of his line of tuners, while his son William continued the Gilbert tradition of high quality concert guitars. Gilbert guitars have been used by David Russel, David Leisner, George Sakellariou, David Tanenbaum, Frederic Hand, Earl Klugh, Raphaella Smits, and many others.

His legacy lives on HERE  http://wgilbertguitars.com/john-gilbert-s-passing-away/ and HERE https://gilberttuners.com/

I have edited out some of the more technical details to make it more suitable for beginner to intermediate level guitarists.

“How do I choose a good guitar?” After years of hearing this query I decided,
several years ago, to write a brief outline of those things that are pertinent to the question. At the same time I decided that this guide could serve as a format for the lectures I give on this subject. I would like to share that outline with you now and then proceed to a more detailed discussion of some of the points it raises.

How to Select a Guitar

The four areas to look into are:
1. Sound
2. Action and feel
3. Condition and construction
4. Cost

The most important of these is Sound: That’s what the guitar is all about
…sound. There are several ways to check for sound:
a. Bring a good sounding guitar for comparison.
b. Bring along a friend with a good ear who can also play.
c. When testing guitars do it outdoors or if that isn’t possible, do it in the largest room you can find.

The important facets of overall sound quality are:
1. Timbre. (Quality of the individual tones.)
2. Balance. (Trebles must match bass.)
3. Separation. (The clarity with which individual tones can be distinguished in a
chord.)
4. Sustain. (The rate of decay of a tone after it is struck.)
5. Loudness.
6. Intonation.
Always remember that sound can rarely be greatly improved in a guitar without tremendous expense.

Action and Feel.

Action is the height of the strings above the fret and fingerboard. Feel pertains to those features that comprise the playability of a guitar other than the action, such as: neck size and shape; string length; string spacing and location from the edges of the fingerboard; body shape. Actions can usually be corrected at moderate expense. Other than reducing fingerboard width and neck size, little else can sensibly be done to change the feel.

Condition and Construction.

If the guitar is new, then examine it for clean construction inside the body and
carefully tap around the face and back to check for broken struts. Check for depressed or swollen face. See if the bridge is on tightly. Check the condition of the neck and frets. If the guitar is old, examine it for the above conditions plus cracks in the face, back, sides, neck-to-body joint, head-to-neck joint, purfling and centerjoint of the back. Also examine the tuning machines for worn gears or sloppy installation.

Cost.

Let the buyer beware! Know the seller! Ask about a guarantee. Shopmaround. Remember the most costly guitar isn’t always the best. Think about re-sale.

Sound

Loudness.  If you intend to give recitals and concerts in large halls, you had better be sure that the guitar you choose projects well. The best place to test for this is outdoors. If weather deters you, the second best method is to use an auditorium, gymnasium, or a church. Lacking all of the above, use the largest room you can find. When making this test and, for that matter, all test pertaining to sound, it helps to have a proven guitar along (or several) to use as a basis for comparison and, naturally, someone to play for you and to listen while you play. If you do not plan on concertizing or if you intend to amplify electronically, loudness is not the most important factor of sound to you, but all other sound qualities will be. So at this time, with guitar in hand, let us test for them.

Timbre  is purely subjective, so that what sounds great to me may not impress you at all. However, the instrument must have a tone quality that truly satisfies you, or you will not enjoy playing it no matter what other attributes it may have.

Balance. This I prefer to think of as mostly an objective test because if either the treble or bass end is weak, it will be very noticeable heard at a distance. Be sure to test for this by barring each fret from the first to the twelfth because some guitars have weaknesses more pronounced in certain areas of the fingerboard than others.

Separation (or clarity) is, to a great degree, a quality that goes untested by most players because it is such a difficult and elusive feature to listen for. When a guitar has loudness, good timbre and balance, it is hard to remind yourself to really listen to chords to see if you can hear individual tones (like a good barbershop quartet) or only a glob of sound.

Sustain. Some guitars have an even output of sound and will appear to have good sustain, whereas a guitar with a robust or popping initial output of sound will seem to have less sustain. Therefore, when comparing guitars set a metronome at some fast tempo and count the beats from pluck (or pick) to silence. Some interesting facts will emerge by trying this with different guitars. As to the amount of sustain, all tones on the guitar should have some, with the lowest tones having more than the higher tones.

Wake Up the Soundbox
One word of advice about testing guitars: be sure to play the instrument for at least ten minutes or more before testing in order to “wake up” the soundbox. This is particularly true for spruce-faced guitars. Cedar faces are less likely to require this.

Intonation is included as a branch of sound quality because if the guitar doesn’t play in tune it sounds bad. Fortunately, you can check for fretting accuracy and saddle and nut placement. If errors are found, they can be easily corrected by any competent repair person.

There are several ways to test for tonal accuracy. Let us start with one that many of you are familiar with. Play each string at the 12th fret. Then strike the 12th fret harmonic. These should be identical in pitch. If they are, it tells us only that the maker placed the saddle correctly. If all six strings play sharp, it tells us that the saddle wasn’t set back far enough. If all strings play flat, it tells us that the saddle is set too far back. The cure for either of these conditions is to have the saddle or nut reshaped or repositioned. Again, a repair person should be consulted. Keep in mind that faulty strings can also sound either sharp or flat, but never all six in the same direction. So you should be able to rule out the occasional bad string.

Action

Another important topic for discussion is the action of the guitars. It is possible to mechanically check to see if yours has a good one. Here is a simple and effective test.Depress the strings one at a time at the 1st fret without  sounding the note. Measure the height from the top of the 12th fret to the bottom of each string, using a steel ruler with .010” graduations.
The readings should be:
1st string, .100” to .115”
2nd string, .110” to .120”
3rd string, .120” to .130”
4th string, .125” to .135”
5th string, .130” to .140”
6th string, .135” to .145”

These readings are for classical guitars. The lower readings constitute a low action and the higher readings, a normal action. Anything higher would indicate a high action. Keep in mind that the required action height will vary for different players due to two things: one, the player’s attack style and two, how hard he /she plays the strings. Also, these readings do not take into account the fret condition or the straightness of the fingerboard.

Here is a John Gilbert guitar in action.

21st century pieces – musical or what?

The fact that I do not really know what to call this article speaks to my confusion regarding 21st music for the classical guitar. Some call the subject of my wondering modern, others contemporary, and yet others 21st century. The only way I can explain myself is to give some examples.

Manuel Ponce wrote Sonata III, Carlos Seixas composed Sonata No 23, and Antonio Lauro gave us Vals Venezolano No 3, and I can appreciate the musicality in all three. They are not what I would choose to listen to often and I do not have the technical skills to play them, but I can relate to them at some levels. However, Joao Luiz’s Xie and Toru Takemitzu’s Equinox just confuse, Jar, and leave me feeling as though I have endured rather than enjoyed.

Here is an example of the kind of 21st classical guitar music that I just don’t ‘get’ – have a listen:

Steven H. Somers plays his own composition, ‘21st Century Suite’.

Now I don’t know much about Steven Somers and his music might not properly represent the genre, so I have selected an example from the work of the great Leo Brouwer. Here is his Sonata V – Ars Combinatoria I – vivace played by Andrey Lebedev

My confusion deepens when I compare this to his Un Dia de Noviembre, which I like a lot and am currently learning to play.

Here it is played by Tatyana Ryzhkova.

Leo Brouwer composed prolifically and has a huge international reputation, so what’s with his Sonata V, and other works like Sonata Fandangos y Boleros and Sonata del Pescador? My confusion deepens.

From what I can tell, the pieces I have problems with are technically challenging and encompass a range of ornamentations, stretches, speed bursts and so on, but they seem disjointed, lacking in any discernible rhythm, over-filled with discords, and generally unpleasing to the ear. What am I missing? Ok, so I am a 70-year-old intermediate level guitarist without any formal music school education, but isn’t music supposed to be pleasing to the ear, evocative, and … well perhaps here is my problem, my definition of ‘music’.

As a younger man, I had the same sort of problem with much modern art. Critics raved about what appeared to me to be a slapdash mess of forms and colours, but my impression was that a 6-year-old child could have done as well. I can’t say the same for the kind of classical guitar music that befuddles me because I can see that they would be extremely hard to play. I can understand, therefore, why some performers would use such pieces to display their skills, but do they enjoy playing them, and do people enjoy listening to them?

I am hoping that someone will explain to me the value of such music because even in my old age I am keen to learn. I have searched the internet for some credible critique but have so far found nothing that makes sense to me. Perhaps I am missing something that will change the way I process music or perhaps much 21st Century classical guitar music is just a big con… like much that passes for art, wisdom, and value these days.

 

Pithy advice for classical guitar performers

 

What follows is an extract from an article by Renato Bellucci on his mangore.com website. Renato is both an accomplished classical guitarist and a luthier. Over the years, he has come in for some severe criticism regarding the quality and value of his guitars, but there is no doubt that he has a deep understanding of both the instrument and performing on it.

Here is his advice concerning performing before an audience.

‘Advice I have and a lot has been written about the practical things we can do in order to give a good recital. These are some of the things I learned and apply to me.

DO NOT PLAY A PIECE OF MUSIC IN PUBLIC UNTIL YOU LIKE IT IN PRIVATE. Do not think for a second that the mistake/s we make while practising won’t appear on stage. They will FOR SURE.

PLAY MUSIC YOU REALLY LIKE and avoid competitions unless this point and the previous one are ok and make sure you go there to win and not to learn. Everyone knows who the winner is after the first round is over… the rest is meeting the scheduled dates. Learning should be left for practice time, not for competitions and as Berlioz once said: “Competitions are for horses, not for musicians”.

REMEMBER THAT ONLY 0.5% of the public will notice a mistake unless you put a TAG on it (like saying I am sorry).

99.9% of the people attending are there to cheer you up, make sure you are one of them.

If a PRO is there, you are lucky.

START THE PROGRAM WITH THE PIECE OR PIECES YOU ARE TOTALLY FAMILIAR WITH. In other words, start-off with the right foot, unless you are in for the thrill of your life.

IF FOR ANY REASON YOU DECIDE THE CONDITIONS ARE NOT RIGHT FOR A GIVEN PIECE, SKIP THE PIECE. Trust your feelings, nobody gets a receipt on the way in or out of a concert hall.

CHANGE THE STRINGS AT LEAST 3 DAYS BEFORE A CONCERT.

IT’S PERFECTLY OK TO HAVE YOUR SCORES ON STAGE.

YOU ARE NOT THERE TO IMPRESS ANYBODY.

REST ON THE DAY OF THE CONCERT, even better, have a great time, laugh a lot!

ENJOY THE MOMENT and make your own personal list.

LOOK FORWARD TO A BAD REVIEW, It’s better than no review at all and you were at least worth the ink’.

Excellent article by Marcelo Kayath

I came across this article in the March 11th GSI Blog and I think it is worth sharing on Classical Guitar SA. The article is titled GUITAR – A SMALL ORCHESTRA OR A GRAND PIANO? and in it, Marcelo traces the development of classical guitar music from the end of the 18th century up to the present time. Click HERE for the article

And here is an example of Marcelo performing pieces from the Suite in F Major SW 33 by Sylvius Leopold Weiss where he demonstrates a number of the points he makes in his article.

 

Knowing your classical guitar

 

My apologies to experienced players, but I wrote this article for those just starting out as players or interested non-players.

In this article, I deal briefly with a range of aspects of guitar construction, playability, intonation, humidity, strings and so on. I have only built one classical guitar, but I am a passionate enthusiast and I have researched and experimented quite a bit.

HERE is the article.

Millennial classical guitarists

 

In this, the 3rd and final post in the series, I am featuring 10 incredible players 35 years old or younger I have ordered them from youngest to oldest to maximise the impact. What wonderful talent in such young people!

 

Linda Bernert (10) plays Tango en skaï by Roland Dyens

 

Nina Bernert (12 now 14) plays Phantasia D major by David Kellner

 

Leonora Spangenberger (13 now 15 years old) plays 12 Etudes by Heitor Villa Lobos: Etude No 1

 

Julia Lange (19) plays Asturias by Isaac Albeniz

 

Stephanie Jones (24 years old) plays Recuerdos de la Alhambra by F. Tárrega

 

Anna Likhacheva (25 years old)  plays Russian folk song “Ivushka”

 

Gabriel Bianco (29 years old) plays Variations on Venice Carnival

 

Su Meng (30 years old) plays Bach Prelude, Allegro – Presto

 

Kyuhee Park (33 years old)  plays El Ultimo Tremelo by Augustin Barrios Mangore

 

Milos Karadaglic (35 years old)  plays’Oriental’ by Enrique Granados

If you would like to receive an email notification each time there is a new post to guitarsa.co.za then simply complete the small form at the top right of the page.

10 top Generation-X classical guitarists

As promised, here is a list of 10 top Generation-X classical guitarists aged between 40 and 55.

I have avoided using the word ‘best’ when referring to this list because of how different folk understand this ascription. Some comments to previous posts are; “there is no ‘best’, just opinions”, and “the best players are those who embrace the ‘new’ compositions”, and “No way! Eliot Fisk is the best because of his innovation and energy”. I guess we could have a shot at determining who the best players are by adopting a comprehensive set of criteria and an impartial assessment methodology, but what’s the point? Certainly, my reason for compiling these lists is to provide reference points, learning opportunities, and listening pleasure.

In the 3rd and final post in this series, I intend to feature another 10 fabulous players 35 years old and under.

Xuefei Yang (41 years old)

http://www.xuefeiyang.com

Manhã de Carnaval by Luiz Bonfá

 

Graham Anthony Devine (47 years old)

www.grahamanthonydevine.com/

Gnossienne No. 1 by Erik Satie

 

Galina Vale (38 years old)

www.galinavale.com/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gj4jve_D4n0

Embedding disabled on youtube – click on above link to access the video.

Russian gypsy song “Otchi chornie”

 

Gorge Caballero (41 years old)

https://www.jorgecaballeroguitar.com/

Capriccio Espagnol by Rimsky Korsakov

 

Paul Galbraith (54 years old)

www.paul-galbraith.com/

Bajo La Palmera by Albeniz

 

Margarita Escarpa (53 years old)

http://www.volterraguitar.org/bio-margarita-escarpa.html

F. TÁRREGA (1852-1909): “Endecha”, “Oremus”, “Capricho Árabe”

 

Paulo Martelli (52 years old)

https://www.facebook.com/martelliguitar/

Remembrance by Sergio Assad

 

Matthew McAllister (? Years old)

www.matthewmcallister.com/

Scottish Lute Pieces

 

Amanda Cook (? Years old)

www.amandacook.co.uk/wordpress/

Zalopojka from Balkan Miniatures by Bogdanović

 

Craig Ogden (? Years old)

www.craigogden.com/

Prelude to Lute Suite no.4 BWV.1006a by Bach

If you would like to receive an email notification each time there is a new post to guitarsa.co.za then simply complete the small form at the top right of the page.

‘Best’ living classical guitarist

My last post featured John Williams, and although many commented favourably, there were one or two critical of John’s virtuosity. When I searched the threads in the Delcamp forum,  I soon realised that there are as many opinions on the ‘best’ living classical guitarist as there are on what constitutes ‘best’.

The criteria for judging ‘best’ appear to fall into four categories: musicality, technique, tone production, and emotional impact. However, what interested me more was the sheer number of CG players listed among the top three picks… 38 in total!

So, I have compiled a list of just the top 10 candidates. I have done this as a basis for further research, learning, and listening pleasure. I have arranged the list based on the number of different people identifying them as part of the top three living players. Of course, the list is not meant as any sort of definitive ranking, but rather as an inspiration for run-of-the-mill classical guitarists like me. Along with each name are links to their websites and a video of them playing.

Of the 10 maestros listed, seven are over 60 years of age, and so the fear for many is that the era of classical guitar greats is passing. Not so! In my next post, I intend to highlight 10 great players between 40 and 55 years old. Then in a 3rd post I intend to feature another 10 fabulous players 35 years old and under. The future of the classical guitar looks bright to me!

1.  Julian Bream (84 years old)

http://www.julianbreamguitar.com/

Grand Solo by Fernando Sor

2.  David Russell (64 years old)

http://www.davidrussellguitar.com/

Choro No 1 by Villa-Lobos

3.  John Williams (76 years old)

http://www.johnwilliamsguitarnotes.com/

Sevilla by Albeniz

4.  Ana Vidovic (37 years old)

http://www.anavidovic.com/

La Catedral by Barrios Mangore

5.  Marcin Dylla (41 years old)

http://www.marcindylla.com/

la Alborada by Francisco Tárrega

6.  Jason Vieaux (44 years old)

https://www.jasonvieaux.com/

Bach: Lute Suite No. 3 in E minor, BWV 996

7.  Manuel Barrueco (65 years old)

http://www.barrueco.com/

Variations on a Theme of Mozart

8. Pepe Romero (74 years old)

https://peperomero.com/

Pepe Romero plays Zapateado & Fantasia from ‘Suite Andalucia’ by Celedonio Romero

9. Christopher Parkening (70 years old)

http://parkening.com/

Christopher Parkening plays Koyunbaba at Harvest Crusade

10. Sharon Isbin (61 years old)

http://www.sharonisbin.com/

Sharon Isbin plays Waltz by Agustin Barrios Mangore

If you would like to receive an email notification each time there is a new post to guitarsa.co.za then simply complete the small form at the top right of the page.

John Williams – King of Classical Guitarists


I am currently reading a biography of this great classical guitarist called, ‘Strings Attached: The Life and Music of John Williams’ by William Starling and published in 2013. So far I am finding it dry reading, so I decided to see what was available on the internet.

The most comprehensive videoed interview with this giant of the classical guitar world that I could find is the four-part production by GuitarCoop:
Part 1 – The Early Years
Part 2 – The Musical Experience
Part 3 – The Composers
Part 4 – Final

However, the overview of his various collaborations (particularly with Julian Bream) that I found the most enjoyable was the 2016 John Williams (Classical Guitar) at the BBC. This 58-minute production contains several full pieces played by the maestro.

There is also a  transcript of an interesting  interview by Classical Guitar Magazine, summer 2016 edition, titled ‘Amazing Legacy: John Williams Reflects on Five Decades of Recordings’.

John Williams is a champion of Greg Smallman guitars which, when he first tried one out were unknown but now sell new for around $36,000. Classical Guitar Review interviewed John in 2010 and in Part Three of their publication he gave the reasons for his switch from Fleta to Smallman guitars.

Serval years after first meeting Greg Smallman, John visited him in his workshop deep in the Australian wilds and here is a short video clip of that visit.